Aqueous Humor Definition - What is Aqueous Humor?

There are two humors in the eyes, the aqueous humor and the vitreous humor, both of which help to maintain the shape of the eyeball.
The aqueous humor is a transparent liquid that fills the region between the cornea at the front of the eye and the lens.
The vitreous humor is a transparent, jelly-like substance that occupies the region between the lens and the retina at the back of the eye.

How is the aqueous humor produced?

The aqueous humor is constantly secreted by the ciliary body around the lens, so there is a continuous flow of the humor from the lens area to the eye's front chamber.
The aqueous humor is kept at constant pressure by a compensating leakage in the angle between the outer rim of the iris and the back of the cornea.

Function of Aqueous Humor

The aqueous humor carries nutrients and facilitates the exchange of gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) in the cornea and other tissues of the eyeball that have no blood supply.

Aqueous Humor Disorders

Several disorders may affect the aqueous humor. Disturbances of the drainage mechanism that maintains a constant fluid pressure in the aqueous humor may cause an increase in the pressure, a condition called glaucoma.
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